Christian or pagan – the Origin of Valentine’s Day ?

cupid-3cExploring the Pagan roots of the Valentine’s Day holiday.

 

   “When thou art come into the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee . . . . thou shalt not learn to do after the abominations of those nations . . . for because of these abominations the LORD (Jehovah, Yehuwah) thy God doth drive them out from before thee !”
Deuteronomy 18:9-12

     “After the doings (ways) of the land of Egypt, wherein ye dwelt, shall ye not do . . .and after the doings of the land of Canaan, whither I bring you, shall ye not do; neither shall ye walk in their ordinances . . . . Defile not ye yourselves in any of these things: for in all these the nations are defiled which I cast out before you.     And the land is defiled: therefore I do visit the iniquity thereof upon it, and the land itself vomiteth out her inhabitants . . . !”     Leviticus 18:1-26

—————–

     Regardless of race and religion, almost every couple in the world celebrates Valentine’s Day. In fact, it is considered the second widely celebrated event after the Christmas or Yuletide Season. Only a few people know that Valentine’s Day is originally a Catholic celebration. But there are even fewer individuals who know its earlier pagan roots.

faunus-godsThe Darkness of Valentine’s Day and its Pagan Origins

     Valentine’s Day originated from the pagan festival Lupercalia which is a celebration of fertility and purification. Lupercalia is named after Lupercus, the god of fertility and hunter of wolves in Roman mythology. It’s a 3-day event that runs from the 13th to 15th of February. But before our current Gregorian calendar, the festivity usually falls on spring season.

     The month of February is also associated with Lupercalia. Part of the rituals held during the festivities is the Februa, Februatio or Februare which literally means purification. Februa is a purification ritual performed to drive away evil spirits in the entire city or community and to ensure fertility for the spring or planting season.

     An old Roman and pagan activity observed during Lupercalia is the love lottery. In this tradition, young men are paired with women through a simple lottery system. Names of all participating females shall be placed in a jar after which, each male shall draw or pick a name that will be temporarily paired with him. The pairs will act as lovers or partners for the entire duration of the festival. This tradition was carried by the ancient Romans overseas as their empire grew.

     Another notable activity is the gathering of ancient Luperci priests at Pallupercalia-valentineatine Hills or the boundaries of the ancient city of Rome. This tradition persisted up to the time of Julius Caesar wherein the Master of the Luperci College of Priest during that period was Mark Anthony.

     During the 1st and 2nd century, the Christian or Catholic religion started to grow. Much of the Pagan cultures and traditions were also assimilated and reinvented to fit the Catholic tradition and to attract early pagans to become Christians. In 496 A.D., then Pope Gelasius declared the Lupercalia traditions particularly the love lottery as immoral. The Pope changed the love lottery tradition into a saint lottery where each young boy tries to mimic the qualities of the saint he picks all throughout the year. Pope Gelasius also declared February 14 as the feast of Saint Valentine, the patron of lovers.

The story (legend) of Saint Valentine.   Valentine was a young priest that lived during Emperor Claudius’ reign. In his desire to perform his Christian duties of administering wedding ceremonies and aiding prisoners, he disobeyed the orders of the emperor. For Claudius, men should serve the Roman army first before getting married. For this reason, Valentine was incarcerated and sentenced to death. Based on historical accounts, Valentine was regularly visited by his jailer’s blind daughter whom he later fell in love with. Before Valentine’s execution, he wrote her a note and ending it with the phrase “From Your Valentine.”

     One of the [supposed] miracles of (attributed to) Saint Valentine was the healing of that girl’s eyesight. This has also resulted to his jailer’s change of faith. Valentine’s letter to his beloved girl is considered to be the earliest Valentine’s Day card. And it’s only during the 17th century when Valentine’s Day cards were commercialized, mass produced and prefabricated.

original article source:   World Religion and News.com
February 11, 2017 posted by Kelly Frazier

note:   We encourage every reader to remember, that we must always share the Truth in love. A good way to begin is by offering to those we truly love, a better alternative to these ancient pagan practices, adopted by the Roman Catholic Church.  And give to your wife or husband an invitation to spend the afternoon or evening with you on another day, and such gifts as which will not pass away . . . . your life offered in the daily sacrifice of all selfish desires on their behalf.    In such a way which honours the LORD (Jehovah, Yehuwah) our God, and our Saviour Jesus Christ.

     “And I heard another voice from heaven saying . . . . Come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the LORD . . . that ye be not partakers of her sins, and that ye receive not of her plagues. For her sins (Babylon’s) have reached unto heaven, and God hath remembered her iniquities . . . !”
II Corinthians 6:17-18 and Revelation 18:4-5

For a more indepth study on this question:
https://www.thetrumpet.com/article/4801.2.0.0/society/uncovering-the-origins-of-mardi-gras-and-other-christian-festivals

Who was Easter ?

“The renowned Oxford English Dictionary informs us that the name Easter is derived from the name of a goddess whose festival was celebrated at the time of the vernal equinox. We are told that she was originally known as the dawn goddess – no doubt the origin of sunrise celebrations at the time of Easter.

According to Venerable Bede, a seventh century Anglo-Saxon theologian, the English word Easter is derived from the name of the pagan fertility goddess Eostra. He tells us that “the heathen Anglo-Saxons called the fourth month “Esturmonath” after their goddess Eostra – another name representing the spring fertility goddesses such as Astarte or Ashtaroth, the goddess who was introduced into the British Isles by the Druids. In all actuality Easter is just another name for Beltis or Ishtar of the ancient Babylonians and can be traced all the way back to Hathor, the cow goddess of Egypt that was associated with the building of the golden calf at Mt. Sinai. Continue reading