The Exodus Movie – Re-examined ?

     “By faith Moses, when he was come to years, refused to be called the son of Pharaoh’s daughter . . . . Choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God (Elohim – the Mighty One), than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season; esteeming the reproach of Christ as greater riches than the treasures in Egypt . . . . for he had respect unto the recompence of the reward !

    By faith, he forsook Egypt . . . and faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the Word of God . . .  not fearing the wrath of the king . . . for God hath not given unto us the spirit of fear, but of power, of love (self-sacrifice), and of a sound mind . . . . For He endured, as seeing Him that is invisible !       ref: Romans 10:17 & II Timothy 1:7

     Through faith (in Jehovah’s promise of a Lamb slain from the foundation of the world), he kept the Passover, and the sprinkling of blood . . . lest He that destroyed the first born of Egypt (Matthew 10:28) should touch them. And by faith they (the children of Abraham) passed through the Red Sea as by dry land . . . . which the Egyptians assaying (attempting) to do were drowned . . .

     And what more shall I say?
For the time would fail me to tell of Gideon, and Barak, and of Samson, and of Jephthae; of David also, and of Samuel, and the prophets . . . . who through faith, subdued kingdoms, wrought righteousness, obtained promises, and stopped the mouths of lions . . . . Wherefore seeing we also are compassed about with (surrounded by) so great a cloud of witness of God’s unfailing love and power . . . Let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which doth so easily beset us, and let us run with patience (Hebrews 10:23) the race that is set before us, looking unto Jesus the Author and the Finisher of our faith . . . . For He is faithful that hath promised . . . !”   Hebrews 11:23-40, 12:14, 11:11 & ref: II Corinthians 1:20

     Moses had been learning much that he must unlearn. The influences that had surrounded him in Egypt . . . .

Moses would have dispensed with that long period of toil and obscurity, deeming it a great loss of time. But Infinite Wisdom called him who was to become the leader of his people to spend forty years in the humble work of a shepherd. The habits of caretaking, of self-forgetfulness and tender solicitude for his flock, thus developed, would prepare him to become the compassionate, longsuffering shepherd of Israel. No advantage that human training or culture could bestow, could be a substitute for this experience.

Moses had been learning much that he must unlearn. The influences that had surrounded him in Egypt–the love of his foster mother, his own high position as the king’s grandson, the dissipation (self-indulgence, carnal pleasures) on every hand, the refinement, the subtlety, and the mysticism of a false religion, the splendor of idolatrous worship, the solemn grandeur of architecture and sculpture –all had left deep impressions upon his developing mind and had molded, to some extent, his habits and character.

Time, change of surroundings, and communion with God could remove these impressions. It would require on the part of Moses himself a struggle as for life to renounce error and accept Truth, but God would be his helper when the conflict should be too severe for human strength . . .”    – Patriarchs and Prophets, p.248

Moses thought of the difficulties to be encountered, of the blindness, ignorance, and unbelief of his people, many of whom were almost destitute of a knowledge of God. “Behold,” he said, “when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The God of your fathers hath sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, What is His name? what shall I say unto them?” The answer was . . . . “I AM THAT I AM.” “Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.”     ref: Exodus 3:1-15, Exodus 6:1-8 & John 18:1-6

. . . Moses was forewarned that Pharaoh would resist the appeal to let Israel go. Yet the courage of God’s servant must not fail; for the LORD (Jehovah, Yehuwah) would make this the occasion to manifest His power before the Egyptians and before His people. “And I will stretch out My hand, and smite Egypt with all My wonders which I will do in the midst thereof: and after that he will let you go.”

. . . Moses saw before him difficulties that seemed insurmountable. What proof could he give his people that God had indeed sent him? “Behold,” he said, “they will not believe me, nor hearken unto my voice: for they will say, The LORD hath not appeared unto thee. Evidence that appealed to his own senses was now given. He was told to cast his rod upon the ground. As he did so, “it became a serpent; and Moses fled from before it.” He was commanded to seize it, and in his hand it became a rod.

He was bidden to put his hand into his bosom. He obeyed, and “when he took it out, behold, his hand was leprous as snow.” Being told to put it again into his bosom, he found on withdrawing it that it had become like the other. By these signs the LORD assured Moses that His Own people, as well as Pharaoh, should be convinced that One mightier than the king of Egypt was manifest among them.

But the servant of God was still overwhelmed by the thought of the strange and wonderful work before him. In his distress and fear he now pleaded as an excuse a lack of ready speech: “O my Lord, I am not eloquent, neither heretofore, nor since Thou hast spoken unto Thy servant; but I am slow of speech, and of a slow tongue.” He had been so long away from the Egyptians that he had not so clear knowledge and ready use of their language as when he was among them.

Note: according to the Holy Scriptures, Moses was 40 years old when he fled Egypt; and he spent another 40 years as a shepherd, tending the flocks of sheep in the wilderness. It was at the age of 80 years that the LORD then called Moses to the mission and purpose for which He had called him, and preserved him, as a child.

The LORD said unto him, “Who hath made man’s mouth? or who maketh the dumb, or deaf, or the seeing, or the blind? have not I the LORD?”   To this was added another assurance of divine aid: “Now therefore go, and I will be with thy mouth, and teach thee what thou shalt say.” But Moses still entreated that a more competent person be selected. These excuses at first proceeded from humility and diffidence; but after the LORD had promised to remove all difficulties, and to give him final success, then any further shrinking back and complaining of his unfitness showed distrust of God. It implied a fear that God was unable to qualify him for the great work to which He had called him, or that He had made a mistake in the selection of the man.

Moses was now directed to Aaron, his elder brother, who, having been in daily use of the language of the Egyptians, was able to speak it perfectly. He was told that Aaron was coming to meet him. The next words from the Lord were an unqualified command:
Thou shalt speak unto him, and put words in his mouth: and I will be with thy mouth, and with his mouth, and will teach you what ye shall do. And he shall be thy spokesman unto the people: and he shall be, even he shall be to thee instead of a mouth, and thou shalt be to him instead of God. And thou shalt take this rod in thine hand, wherewith thou shalt do signs.”

He could make no further resistance, for all ground for excuse was removed. The Divine command given to Moses found him self-distrustful, slow of speech, and timid. He was overwhelmed with a sense of his incapacity to be a mouthpiece for God to Israel. But having once accepted the work, he entered upon it with his whole heart, putting all his trust in the LORD. The greatness of his mission called into exercise the best powers of his mind. God blessed his ready obedience, and he became eloquent, hopeful, self-possessed, and well fitted for the greatest work ever given to man. This is an example of what God does to strengthen the character of those who trust Him fully and give themselves unreservedly to His commands . . . “
– Patriarchs and Prophets, p.248-255

The Full Text of Patriarchs & Prophets is available on line as a PDF, for those who would like to read further.
http://www.upliftingbooks.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Patriarchs-and-Prophets.pdf

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